Tuesday, February 16, 2010

Look at the Bright Side

This kind of thing answers the question, "How do we market RPGs and make people aware of them?"

The biggest period of success for both of my main obsessions happened at a time when they were being accused of inspiring this sort of thing and they were both in the news constantly for contributing to the downfall of civilization.

It may be a chicken-egg thing (did the publicity feed their popularity or did their popularity draw the publicity?), but I don't think it's a coincidence.

That said, what a bunch of shit.

11 comments:

  1. Hmm weird. I think religions have killed more people then D&D but that doesn't make it into the headlines very often.

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  2. They should check if both people watched tv, or played computer games, or liked sushi...using innuendo to imply that D&D was a root cause of two murders is asinine to say the least, and certainly poor journalism (I won't get started on how I believe journalists are a lower form of life than ambulance-chasing lawyers).

    Heck, even the title seems to be in pretty poor English...

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  3. That makes me feel like I'm back in 1984 again! They should've specified which edition. I'm guessing it was those 3.5 or 4.0 players, they play too many video games. :)

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  4. I kind of like being dangerous again.

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  5. That's certainly not a good way to gain tenure. I would bring something with a lot more firepower.

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  6. “They even acted this crap out,” the source said.

    So, LARPing is to blame, right?

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  7. It's my fault. It was because of CARCOSA.

    ;)

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  8. I guess there are Grognard Jouralists too.

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  9. Police seized two Dungeons & Dragons books from McDermott’s Haverhill apartment after he shot seven co-workers to death on Dec. 26, 2000.

    "He hid them behind his collection of firearms and military paraphernalia, but we got them," said chief of police Joey Knobhead. "We have reasons to believe he may have used them to cast a spell to kill his colleagues."


    Seriously.

    Some experts have cited the D&D backgrounds of people who were later involved in violent crimes, while others say it just a game.

    When questioned how the Boston Herald identified these "experts", the Boston Herald told the Boston Herald that they were "wearing white lab coats". When asked why psychologists would wear lab coats, the Boston Herald correspondent shrugged and said that "it's not my business to know what these experts are up to".


    Seriously.

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  10. Pity the poor people of Boston for Laurel J Sweet walks among them, victim of a maliciously cast Feeblemind spell...

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  11. Judging from the comments left on the article, we're in no danger of a witch hunt. :)

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